Bite-size Review: Butterfly Dreams and Other Stories | Beatrice Lamwaka

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Butterfly Dreams and Other Stories | Beatrice Lamwaka

This collection of stories and poems from Beatrice Lamwaka is a powerful contribution to Ugandan literature. Not only does she question the internal politics of Uganda but raises issues that are pertinent the world over. A few of the stories are rooted in the atrocities endured by the Acholi people of Northern Uganda during the time of Joseph Kony and the Lords Resistance Army. The opening story Butterfly Dreams is a short yet formidable read as it conveys the suffering of the individual, the family and society at large as it Continue reading “Bite-size Review: Butterfly Dreams and Other Stories | Beatrice Lamwaka”

Bite-size Review: All the Good Things Around Us | Edited by Ivor Agyeman-Duah

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This new anthology of African Short Stories is one of the season’s favourite. It brings together renowned, old and new voices, such as Ama Ata Aidoo, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Yvonne Oduor, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Tope Folarin and many more.  The varied writing styles, flirtations with language and vast array of themes explored offer us a cleverly crafted repertoire of human interactions. Unlike the cliché of doom and gloomy Africa, it illuminates the myriad experiences that project the continent’s universal quality as oppose to its ill begotten uniqueness of being. Continue reading “Bite-size Review: All the Good Things Around Us | Edited by Ivor Agyeman-Duah”

Bite-size Review: There Is A Country: New Fiction From the New Nation Of South Sudan

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There Is A Country: New Fiction From the New Nation Of South Sudan

This is perhaps the first of many to come. There Is A Country: New Fiction From the New Nation Of South Sudan, edited by Nyoul Leuth Tong is a riveting collection of eight short pieces that set the tone for the birth of a new nation, forged out of the debris and cinders of war and destruction. Continue reading “Bite-size Review: There Is A Country: New Fiction From the New Nation Of South Sudan”

Bite-size Review: Opening Spaces: Contemporary African Women’s Writing | Edited By Yvonne Vera

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Opening Spaces: Contemporary African Women’s Writing | Edited by Yvonne Vera

A worthy and compelling collection of women’s struggles throughout the generations- from our great grandmothers to present. This gem elucidates the resilience and tenacity of the human spirit. In each story, regardless of the circumstance, each woman and girl wins on her own terms, singularly and collectively. There is no victimisation, no shaming but rather a showcase of variable strengths and quiet achievements. Exploring stories from all regions of the continent and diaspora, the collection really does open space for women to be celebrated, discussed and enamoured. Continue reading “Bite-size Review: Opening Spaces: Contemporary African Women’s Writing | Edited By Yvonne Vera”

Bite-size Review: The Collector Of Treasures and Other Botswana Village Tales | Bessie Head

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The Collector of Treasures and Other Botswana Village Tales | Bessie Head

The Collector of Treasures and Other Botswana Village Tales is a powerful collection of stories that centres on societal issues and human nature in a specifically African context. They are about the day to day lives and experiences that people go through in the midst of newly attained ‘independence’; issues such as power, sexuality, justice, tradition and modernity arise in a diverse yet interrelated range of ways that show how skilfully Head has gauged the relationship and connections the stories have with one another. Continue reading “Bite-size Review: The Collector Of Treasures and Other Botswana Village Tales | Bessie Head”

Bite-size Review: No Sweetness Here | Ama Ata Aidoo

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No Sweetness Here | Ama Ata Aidoo

And there really isn’t! In this collection of eleven short stories, Aidoo explores a newly independent Ghana during its season of nominal “progress” and “freedom” to reveal through her characters’ conversations the true depth of national divide. Within social conversations (community chatter and clandestine dialogues) Aidoo creates a rhythmic uproar of witty, pious, condemning, bewildering, cunning and entertaining voices throughout each story. Continue reading “Bite-size Review: No Sweetness Here | Ama Ata Aidoo”