Interview with Peter Kimani author of Dance of the Jakaranda

Photo credit: Yusuf Wachira

Peter Kimani is an award-winning Kenyan author and journalist. He works across a broad spectrum of genres, from fiction to non-fiction, poetry and plays. His latest novel, Dance of the Jakaranda, was published in New York in February 2017, to great critical acclaim. Peter Kimani received his formal education in Kenya, the United Kingdom and the United States, where he earned a doctorate in Creative Writing and Literature from the University of Houston in 2014.

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Afrikult. to deliver workshops in Nigeria, Ghana and Kenya

Monday, 3 September 2018

Afrikult. Team from L-R: Keren Lasme, Zaahida Nabagereka and Marcelle Mateki Akita. Photo credit: Sarah Ozo-Irabor.

In the following months the Afrikult. team will be travelling to Nigeria, Ghana and Kenya to take part in the Kaduna Book and Arts festival, Pa Gya! A literary festival in Accra and collaborative work with Jalada Africa collective in Nairobi. Through the generous support of Book Buzz Foundation, Miles Morland Foundation and Arts Council England the team is able to extend their literary and creative writing workshops to young people and adults on the African continent, while also conducting research and building networks necessary in widening access to African literatures, which is the literary organisation’s core mission. Continue reading “Afrikult. to deliver workshops in Nigeria, Ghana and Kenya”

Bite-size Review: Dance of the Jakaranda | Peter Kimani

AFRIKULT.’S OVERALL RATING: 

Dance of the Jakaranda | Peter Kimani

With lyrical flair, Peter Kimani whisks the reader on a journey of the Iron Snake railway as it travels from the coast and cuts through dense forestry. The advent of the railway is the advent of Kenya’s colonisation, which beckons indentured labourers from India to its shores, a country also currently colonised by the British. In its complicated tracks, Kimani masterfully lays one story of Kenya’s history, probing ideas of national identity and belonging, and love lost through the beginnings of the Lunatic Express to the Big Man leading the country towards her independence.
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Bite-size Review: Devil on the Cross | Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o

AFRIKULT.’S OVERALL RATING: 

Devil on the Cross | Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o

This novel is extraordinarily unique for various reasons, the first being how it actually came into existence. Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o wrote it in his mother tongue Gîkũyũ, on toilet paper during his imprisonment in 1977-78, (he later translated it into the English). Another reason is the way in which African oral tradition is entwined within the text reflecting its initial Gîkũyũ origins but also adding to its creativity and style. Furthermore and perhaps the most controversial aspect of this novel is the depth of its satirical criticism of the neo-colonial stage of imperialism, and the abundance of allegorical facets. Capitalism and greed become personified as characters who proudly claim that ‘Business is my temple, and money is my god’. Continue reading “Bite-size Review: Devil on the Cross | Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o”