Why African Literature (& Culture).

By Marcelle Mateki Akita

Some of you may not be ‘bookaholics’ but literature of any kind, of any history, and of any culture does not limit itself wholly to the media of writing and print. Literature is an art form, and within its own bounds of beauty, cannot and should not have a restricted remit. You may think I’m a hopeless book-romantic and I am not ashamed to admit that. But it’s not just about books, it’s about the life and shape each literature takes and leaves with you. Afrikult. aims to present African Literature in its many forms. We believe that all literature from the African continent (and the African diaspora/descent) carry a part of our identities, an undeniable story, poem, song that relays our shared history, culture and philosophy. Continue reading “Why African Literature (& Culture).”

Bite-size Review: Open City | Teju Cole

AFRIKULT.’S OVERALL RATING: 

Open City | Teju Cole

Exquisitely executed, Cole offers a fresh voice and talent to the African literature scene. His debut novel Open City presents an insight into a young Nigerian doctor who encounters and recollects conversations that he had with strangers and patients. Each conversation reveals meditation of history, social class, culture and the individual experience. Continue reading “Bite-size Review: Open City | Teju Cole”

Bite-size Review: The House of Hunger | Dambudzo Marechera

AFRIKULT.’S OVERALL RATING: 

The House of Hunger | Dambudzo Marechera

House of Hunger as the title of Marechera’s novella effectively captures the cynicism and despair of Zimbabwe’s sociopolitical reality at the time of Ian Smiths controversial administration. Society is ‘hungry’ for political self-determination and retribution; yet through the skilfully crafted narrative it becomes more than just a comment on society, Marechera unapologetically forces his reader to critically engage with the enormity of colonialism’s impact. The repetitive use of visceral language combined with the powerful imagery it evokes creates a stagnant and cramped environment in which the unnamed protagonist and his counterparts attempt to survive. Continue reading “Bite-size Review: The House of Hunger | Dambudzo Marechera”