Bite-size Review: The Trouble Causer | Solomon Kubeshenga

AFRIKULT.’S OVERALL RATING: 

The Trouble Causer

A rough gem long abandoned on the wayside waiting to be known. The Trouble Causer sends us on a journey into the wilderness of the African past, where land, man and animal shares close communion. It tells of the tale of Bugeiga, a rich cattle herder of the Mugirakwe clan whose vanity and pride results in a cycle of bitter rivalry, forced migration and disharmony between clansmen and old friends. Reminiscent of the ancient tales told around the fire side, the Ugandan writer, Solomon Kubeshenga presents an intricate web of history, myths and fables that beautifully unravels the customs and traditions that bind precolonial African societies together. Continue reading “Bite-size Review: The Trouble Causer | Solomon Kubeshenga”

Who Named the Continent?

By Marcelle Mateki Akita

‘I am not African because I was born in Africa but because Africa was born in me’ – Kwame Nkrumah

There is no denying that when Africa is mentioned an image or sense of familiarity hits each and every one of us. Concerns towards the state of Africa transcend fixed geographical contours on the globe, stemming from various global constituencies; those associated with the continent by interest, birth or descent. When speaking of Africa, it is often personal and in fact affective. Continue reading “Who Named the Continent?”

Why African Literature: Have Your Say

Written by Prince Ken Osei

Credit: Aaron Burden via unsplash

Over the past couple of years, I have spent  a big chunk of my reading-life, reading and even sometimes re-reading books authored by Africans. This has got nothing to do with me being over-patriotic or too nepotistic but rather in a nutshell as a means of self-rediscovery, or in other words rediscovering my African-ness. The relish with which I jump unto my next book or at an opportunity to buy quality African books at a bargain price has grown fervently if not dramatically with time. The question on why African literature is important, is one that has lingered in the labyrinth of my mind for quite sometime and I find this medium offered by Afrikult. requisite to word my thoughts on this very topic.

Continue reading “Why African Literature: Have Your Say”

Why African Literature: In Search of the Self.

By Henry Brefo

Credit: John-Mark Kuznietsov

My journey towards African literature began with; Homer, Shakespeare Kipling, Conrad, Hemingway and Naipaul. From their works, I found disturbing depictions of Africa and African people. Yet in fitting with the hegemonic cultural trends of my age, I doggedly charted along the English literary canons, hoping to earn the mark of a literary esthete. I learnt of the magnificence of Greek civilisation; arts, politics and science, perused the brilliance and fragility of the Roman Empire and pathologically admired the ‘civilised’ callousness of western powers, especially in the fervent days of colonialism. Continue reading “Why African Literature: In Search of the Self.”

In Defence of African literature!

By Henry Brefo

Credit: Pexels

Commemorate the dead but do not trash the living.

Every so often the debate on African literature redraws the discursive boundaries in attempt to either redefine or reinforce what African literature is or should be? The drama often commence with a celebrated writer exhorting common and emerging textual trends as transgressive. Continue reading “In Defence of African literature!”

Why African Literature (& Culture).

By Marcelle Mateki Akita

Some of you may not be ‘bookaholics’ but literature of any kind, of any history, and of any culture does not limit itself wholly to the media of writing and print. Literature is an art form, and within its own bounds of beauty, cannot and should not have a restricted remit. You may think I’m a hopeless book-romantic and I am not ashamed to admit that. But it’s not just about books, it’s about the life and shape each literature takes and leaves with you. Afrikult. aims to present African Literature in its many forms. We believe that all literature from the African continent (and the African diaspora/descent) carry a part of our identities, an undeniable story, poem, song that relays our shared history, culture and philosophy. Continue reading “Why African Literature (& Culture).”

Bite-size Review: Open City | Teju Cole

AFRIKULT.’S OVERALL RATING: 

Open City | Teju Cole

Exquisitely executed, Cole offers a fresh voice and talent to the African literature scene. His debut novel Open City presents an insight into a young Nigerian doctor who encounters and recollects conversations that he had with strangers and patients. Each conversation reveals meditation of history, social class, culture and the individual experience. Continue reading “Bite-size Review: Open City | Teju Cole”

Bite-size Review: The House of Hunger | Dambudzo Marechera

AFRIKULT.’S OVERALL RATING: 

The House of Hunger | Dambudzo Marechera

House of Hunger as the title of Marechera’s novella effectively captures the cynicism and despair of Zimbabwe’s sociopolitical reality at the time of Ian Smiths controversial administration. Society is ‘hungry’ for political self-determination and retribution; yet through the skilfully crafted narrative it becomes more than just a comment on society, Marechera unapologetically forces his reader to critically engage with the enormity of colonialism’s impact. The repetitive use of visceral language combined with the powerful imagery it evokes creates a stagnant and cramped environment in which the unnamed protagonist and his counterparts attempt to survive. Continue reading “Bite-size Review: The House of Hunger | Dambudzo Marechera”