Interview with Nakisanze Segawa on her novel ‘The Triangle’

 

Nakisanze Segawa

Nakisanze Segawa was born in the Luwero Triangle, Uganda. She is both a fiction writer and a Luganda performance poet. Her poetry and short stories have been published by Jalada and FEMRITE. Nakisanze is a contributor to both the Daily Monitor and Global Press Journal.

A. What was your motivation in writing this novel?

N.S I always thought that Buganda has interesting stories to tell about our past, but I also thought that Kabaka Mwanga was fascinating person. He came onto the throne when he was a teen, in the mid 1800s, at a time when Buganda was experiencing fundamental change. He was faced with lots of challenges, and his responses to these challenges, changed everything, resulting into what we are today as a country. The wars, the deaths, the hopes and frustrations faced by the people of his times motivated me to write this story, The Triangle.  Continue reading “Interview with Nakisanze Segawa on her novel ‘The Triangle’”

Bite-size Review: The Triangle | Nakisanze Segawa

AFRIKULT.’S OVERALL RATING:

The Triangle | Nakisanze Segawa

Published this year Nakisanze Segawa’s The Triangle is a work of historical fiction that will leave you wanting more. Set in the Kingdom of Buganda in the late 1800s the story centres on life at the royal palace. Segawa skilfully makes us privy to the varied and complex relationships played out between the young Kabaka (king) Mwanga II, his wives, his courtiers and the foreigners in his kingdom, European missionaries and Arab merchants. Segawa meticulously researched historical archives in the process of writing this book and it really shows; from Continue reading “Bite-size Review: The Triangle | Nakisanze Segawa”

Bite-size Review: The Kindness Of Enemies | Leila Aboulela

AFRIKULT.’S OVERALL RATING: 

The Kindness of Enemies | Leila Aboulela

Set against the backdrop of globalisation, The Kindness of Enemies is an intelligent, complex and inventive novel that deals with the ravages of cultural estrangement. The lives of five characters (Anna, Shalim, Natasha, Oz and Malak) are intricately threaded together by their experience of politics, religion and culture. Continue reading “Bite-size Review: The Kindness Of Enemies | Leila Aboulela”

Interview with Irenosen Okojie on début novel ‘Butterfly Fish’

Irenosen Okojie

Witty, shy and quirky were the three words that came to mind upon meeting Irenosen Okojie. Her début novel Butterfly fish, found its way to my desk- unannounced. Replacing my customary pick- me- up, I was intoxicated by its rich imaginative ardour. Butterfly fish by Irenosen Okojie  came out in 2016 and is a smooth literary hooch, with a dark personality and complex finish.

Continue reading “Interview with Irenosen Okojie on début novel ‘Butterfly Fish’”

Bite-size Review: Butterfly Fish | Irenosen Okojie

AFRIKULT.’S OVERALL RATING: 

Butterfly Fish | Irenosen Okojie

Enchanting readers with the eloquence of a griot, Irenosen Okojie’s début novel Butterfly Fish brings to life the magic of story telling. In a spellbinding saga of love, deceit, guilt and atonement, it tells of the scourge of the sins of the ancestors upon the coming generation. A brass head forge out of blood, seeks retribution from succeeding heirs, tearing families apart and destroying livelihoods. Continue reading “Bite-size Review: Butterfly Fish | Irenosen Okojie”

A Review of ‘The Shouting in the Dark’- Elleke Boehmer

Reviewed by Jade Lee

The Shouting in the Dark | Elleke Boehmer

The interweaving of the personal, political and historical in such a way that engages the reader is a difficult feat to pull off convincingly in a novel. The fact that Elleke Boehmer manages this so seamlessly, is thanks in large part to the depth of her characters, especially Ella. Ella is engaging because she is believable in all her idiosyncratic strengths and oddities. She is a child caught between two broken people; an angry, thwarted father, embittered by what he sees as Europe’s moral decay, and a mother in a state of constant anxiety and mourning for Holland, and the dead sister whose husband she ultimately married.

Continue reading “A Review of ‘The Shouting in the Dark’- Elleke Boehmer”