Winners of the #WhyBuchi Competition

Sunday, 4 February 2018

We recently ran online campaign #WhyBuchi asking people to write in 100 words why Buchi Emecheta is important to them, ahead of the Celebrating Buchi Emecheta conference held at SOAS. The prize for the winning entries were the relaunched titles of Head Above Water, The Rape of Shavi and Kehinde all newly designed by Victor Ehikhamenor, and published by the revived Omenala Press. We had some really great entries, that highlighted the impact of her work, the bravery she displayed in her writing and the humour she captured in the most challenging of circumstances. Thank you to everyone who participated, it was a pleasure reading your entries! Before sharing the three winning submissions by Mercy Mubanga, Nnamdi Ogochukwu Komlan-Dodoh and Tokunbo Koiki, we wanted to also share with you in a very few words Why Buchi is important us.

Zaahida’s #WhyBuchi
WhyBuchi? For me it’s the range of emotions that I experience when reading her work – they are intense, often bringing me to tears, but I am always left with an overwhelming sense of gratitude that she was brave enough to write so honestly about issues deeply significant to Africa and her diaspora.

Keren’s #WhyBuchi
It is always encouraging and satisfying to know about women like Buchi Emecheta whose life and work have impacted generations of people especially women of colour. They saw in her work a guiding light that helps them navigate in a world which was not always designed for their fulfillment. I am very grateful to take part in this movement of celebration in honour of Buchi Emecheta.

Marcelle’s #WhyBuchi
Buchi Emecheta seared my imagination when I first read ‘The Slave Girl’ in my early twenties. Her work demands attention, your silence and respect. Her death echoes a lamentable void in the African and black British literary chambers. Our #WhyBuchi competition has shown her voice still roars, her words are ablaze, at the turn of every page.

Mercy Mubanga

Buchi Emecheta’s work is important to me because it looks like still water but it runs deep. It has taught me that suffering, in many forms, is inevitable. However, I must not sit and pity myself because no one is coming to save me. It has especially thoroughly communicated that as a woman, my strength is not beyond my reach when I need it most. I am the very vessel that contains this strength and so I needn’t wait for a hero to save me. It has taught me that I have the choice to choose strength each time I am faced with a tragedy I have been made to believe only a man can tackle. 

Nnamdi Ogochukwu Komlan-Dodoh

An inspiration to all; not just the female folk. Buchi Emecheta was and is the definition of succeeding against seemingly impossible odds. Despite the circumstances she found herself in at such a young age, she exhibited the unique strength of the African woman and fought to bring to light experiences never openly talked about before. Her voice – weaved through tales of survival and motherhood – confronts and challenges us in equal measure. Her words remind us why the female voice must be heard and never silenced. I am grateful to her for lighting the fire for us to write without fear.

Tokunbo Koiki

My first reaction when I saw the flyer of this competition was a triumphant THOSE BOOKS ARE MINE! The second, was just how do they expect me to express in merely 100 words the magnitude of how significant Buchi is to me!?! Re-discovering Buchi at a time when I was dealing with my marriage breakdown gave me so much courage. As a single mother of one child, I was inspired by Buchi’s strength raising 5 children in a very racist and hostile environment. The ‘Joys of Motherhood’ gave me permission to be selfish in putting my needs above my child when so required. Why Buchi? Because in sharing her story, she gave me a new reality of motherhood, marriage and womanhood in a way that still motivates me.

 

 

Top 5 Highlights of 2017

Sunday, 31 December 2017

We’ve reached the last day of 2017, and what a year it has been! There have been some amazing titles to come out this year and we are looking forward to adding more exciting titles to our shelves in 2018. We have had a chance to reflect on 2017 and wanted to share our top five highlights of the year. Continue reading “Top 5 Highlights of 2017”

Celebrating Buchi Emecheta x #WhyBuchi Competition

Wednesday, 13 December 2017

If you’re fan of Buchi Emecheta or just getting to know the pioneering novelist’s work, we want to hear from you! Afrikult. is running an exclusive competition for the forthcoming Celebrating Buchi Emecheta event on Saturday 3rd February 2018 – an all-day celebration of the life and work of the acclaimed Nigerian novelist, who passed away in January 2017.  Continue reading “Celebrating Buchi Emecheta x #WhyBuchi Competition”

What is African feminism to you? | Afrikult. workshop at ourselves + others | Sat 25 Nov | SOAS

Wednesday, 22 November 2017

If you’re looking for a weekend filled with rich and intellectual debate and discussion on feminism, an exhibition of black women excellence and vibing to good music then you need to be at ourselves + others: african feminist re-CREATIONS at SOAS this Saturday! And as you guessed, Afrikult. will be there delivering a workshop on nego-feminism and Momtaza Mehri’s poetry with time to write a creative response to material presented.  Sign up via engage@afrikult.com.

Continue reading “What is African feminism to you? | Afrikult. workshop at ourselves + others | Sat 25 Nov | SOAS”

Join Afrikult. this weekend at Digital Blackness and Africa Writes 2017

Thursday, 29 June 2017

Watch out University of Sussex, we’re coming for you! Afrikult. will be chairing the panel The Digital Future of African Literature at the inaugural Digital Blackness conference on Friday 30 June. Our panel discussion will focus on three key areas: the rise and need for digital African literary publishing and platforms, who the digital readers are, and challenges digital African literary publishing and platforms face. Continue reading “Join Afrikult. this weekend at Digital Blackness and Africa Writes 2017”

Afrikult. at Africa Writes 2017, 30 June – 2 July, The British Library

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

We are gearing up for Africa Writes 2017 – the annual African literature festival extraordinaire hosted at the British Library by Royal African Society. Every year the festival attracts a large buzzing audience of readers, publishers, writers and organisations involved in the African literary genre. Continue reading “Afrikult. at Africa Writes 2017, 30 June – 2 July, The British Library”